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Dr. Doug Crase Signs Contract with TCMH

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: Dr. Doug Crase will join TCMH full-time next summer. The Crase Family—Isaac Emfinger; Barbara; Doug, and Kassandra.

Texas County Memorial Hospital has inked a four-year contract with Douglas Crase, MD, a family medicine physician, with ties to the hospital and community.

Crase will work full-time at the TCMH Family Clinic in Licking when he completes his family medicine residency program next June.

Currently Crase is attending Wesley Family Medicine Residency in Wichita, KS.  He will offer complete family medicine and obstetrical care as part of his practice.

Crase has a certificate in radiological technology from Rolla Technical Center and a bachelor’s degree in radiography from Missouri State University.  He is a graduate of the School of Medicine at the University of Missouri in Columbia.

Crase is returning to the place where his career in healthcare began in 2000 as a radiologic technologist in the radiology department at TCMH.  Crase worked for 11 years in the department, completing his undergraduate degree while working at TCMH.

“I enjoyed the time I spend working at TCMH and taking part in providing healthcare for the community,” Crase said.  “I already have experience with the healthcare needs of the community, and I know the importance of physicians in the area.”

Crase noted that he “cannot count the number of times” he’s been asked if he’s returning to the area to work, and that was a primary reason that he considered returning to TCMH.

“I always wanted to work in a small town practice, and the Licking clinic definitely fits that goal,” Crase said.

Crase worked with and remembers longtime Licking family medicine physician, Dr. Eugene Honeywell, and he aspires to fill Honeywell’s shoes by providing care for all ages at the TCMH Family Clinic in Licking.

“The Licking clinic is a place where I can establish a practice and work for the rest of my career,” Crase said, adding, “TCMH and Texas County are a place I can call home.”

“We are very fortunate to have the opportunity to bring Dr. Crase back to Texas County to work in the Licking Clinic,” Wes Murray, chief executive officer at TCMH, said.  He noted Crase knows TCMH and the community well after his years of living in the area and working at the hospital.

Crase will see patients of all ages at the clinic, and he will provide complete obstetrical care, delivering babies at Texas County Memorial Hospital.  Crase will also be on the hospital medical staff, caring for inpatients at TCMH.

Crase will work at the clinic with Whitney Hall, physician assistant at the clinic.

“Dr. Crase knows firsthand the impact a physician can make on the health of people in rural America, and the people of Licking have always been very supportive of their local clinic and healthcare providers,” Murray said.  “We look forward to continuing to provide the full range of healthcare services to Licking and the surrounding area.”

Crase and his wife, Barbara, a teacher, will live in the area.  They have two adult children—Isaac who lives in Edgar Springs and Kassandra who is in college.

For additional information contact the TCMH Family Clinic in Licking at (573) 674-3011.


Courtney Traw is Employee of the Month

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Texas County Memorial Hospital has named Courtney Traw of Cabool the June employee of the month.

Traw is a tech in the emergency department at TCMH where she has worked for almost five years.  Traw was nominated for the award by her supervisor, Jerri Sue Crump, emergency department director.

“Courtney is very dependable, calm, and reliable,” Crump said, describing Traw as “rock solid”.

“Courtney doesn’t make a big deal out of anything that comes up in the department,” Crump said, adding, “She just takes care of whatever problems arise with a smile on her face.”

Crump noted that Traw is “compassionate caregiver” that is known to communicate in a positive manner with patients and staff in the department.

As employee of the month,  Traw received a certificate honoring her achievement; a pin; a special parking place in the TCMH lot; one day of paid vacation; a $50 gift card, and gift certificates to Paws N Claws, D&L Florist; Blissful Nirvana Massage, Wehr Motors, and Savor Grill.  A reception will be held at the hospital in honor of Traw.

Traw is eligible for the 2017 TCMH employee of the year award.

Courtney Traw (right), TCMH June employee of the month, with her supervisor, Jerri Sue Crump.

 


Workplace Violence Training in Use at TCMH

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New workplace violence reduction training is already being used in real life situations at Texas County Memorial Hospital, board members heard at their monthly meeting on Tuesday.

Doretta Todd-Willis, TCMH chief nursing officer, shared that since hospital personnel received training to manage verbally and physically abusive patients, there have been seven verbal abuse incidents and two physical violence incidents.  Patients attempted to bite, scratch, kick, and/or head butt hospital personnel in the physical incidents.

“We recently had a patient come to the emergency department to receive care and immediately became verbally abusive and physically threatening to the nurse doing triage,” Todd-Willis shared with board members.

According to Todd-Willis, the triage nurse noticed the patient digging in a bag trying to find something.  The nurse utilized recent training to recognize the signs for potential violent action, stepping out of the room to request assistance.  The house supervisor assisted the nurse with de-escalating the situation and assessing the patient.

After getting the patient in a bed in an emergency department room, TCMH staff saw the patient pull a large knife out of the bag and place it alongside their body on the bed.  The staff quickly used their training to get the knife from the patient without injury to the patient or to any staff members.

“Our staff felt like this incident would have ended differently if they did not receive STARR (Safe Training and Responsible Restraints) training earlier this year,” Todd-Willis said.

The Missouri Hospital Association (MHA) chose TCMH to participate in the STARR program along with other hospitals in the state.  Mitigation Dynamics in Lee’s Summit, MO worked with the MHA to train employees and to help participating hospitals put policies and procedures in place in their hospital to meet Centers for Medicare Services regulations for healthcare facilities to achieve a higher level of safety for patients, visitors, physicians, and staff.

STARR training includes 16 hours of manual, classroom instruction, training repetition, proficiency testing, report writing, policy review, and scenario-based drills.  Upon successful completion of the STARR training, the hospital staff receives STARR certification.

Fifty employees from a variety of departments at TCMH received STARR certification. The culmination of the training was on site scenario-based training that included 21 different role plays and six different scenarios for teams of STARR-certified hospital staff to handle.

Mike Murray, director of training for Mitigation Dynamics described the TCMH staff as “outstanding”.

“In our training at TCMH, we saw the commitment to excellence by everyone involved,” Murray said.  “The women were awesome, the CEO backed our program, and the employees were excited about the training opportunity.”

Murray noted that 89 percent of the time verbal de-escalation will work in a violent situation.

“In our training scenarios the employees did very well at verbal de-escalation,” Murray said.

Murray explained that the scenario-based training was conducted throughout the hospital, involving every department.

“TCMH is more than ready to respond to incidents of verbal and physical violence that may arise,” Murray said.  “We love giving people the ability to be safe.”

With the STARR training, TCMH has access to an “implementation toolbox” that includes an Activation and Response Flow map, a certification card template, a financial proposal template and a Microsoft Access program.  The Access program can store end-user data and incident reporting data.  The program can track and generate workplace violence incident reports, track employee certification and generate reports about end-user in incident, physical restraint by technique, and more.

Todd-Willis told board members that TCMH is looking at the possibility of a “train the trainer” course available through Mitigation Dynamics.  One or more hospital employees would become a facility STARR trainer so that all TCMH employees could receive STARR training.

“We greatly appreciate MHA allowing us to participate in the program with Mitigation Dynamics,” Todd-Willis said.  “We believe our staff will be able to continue to utilize the knowledge and tools they received to prevent any harm to our patients or our staff.”

TCMH has implemented a security alert STARR response as part of the hospital’s emergency preparedness plan.  STARR response drills will also be conducted regularly at the hospital.

In the monthly quality report, Amanda Turpin, quality management director at TCMH, noted that preliminary value-based purchasing scores appear to be improving.

“The data will not go public until the fall, and it looks like we will end up a little above ‘break even’,” Turpin said, indicating that TCMH will not lose any funds for Medicare patients, and there may be a slightly more funds paid to TCMH due to the scores awards by CMS for certain measures that are reported by all hospitals.

CMS looks at data from all hospitals in areas such as care for heart attack, pneumonia, heart failure, patient safety, mortality, readmission rates, and more.  The hospital’s annual score is based on data from the previous three years.  The score released this fall will be based on data from 2014, 2015, and 2016.

“We have improved what we can over time, and each year we get better,” Turpin said.

Preliminary data shows that TCMH is well below the state and national average scores for “Medicare spending per beneficiary”, the cost to care for a Medicare patient at TCMH.

“The lower the score, the better,” Turpin explained, noting that TCMH also has a very low patient safety composite score.  The current scores place TCMH in the top two percent of hospitals across the US for patient safety.

Turpin noted that re-admissions of hospital inpatients within 30 days of discharge from the hospital is hard to control at TCMH and at most rural hospitals.

“Our patient demographics such as our rural Missouri location and our socio-economic status are not accounted for in the CMS value-based purchasing score,” Turpin said.

A couple of years ago, TCMH began sending nurses to the homes of patients with chronic health conditions after the patients were discharged from the hospital, and that has helped with readmission rates at the hospital.

Turpin explained that CMS is considering ways to account for more patient demographics in the future.

For the month of May hospital inpatient revenues were lower than budgeted expectations, outpatient revenues were above budgeted expectations, and overall expenses were down, according to the financial report from Linda Pamperien, TCMH chief financial officer.

Inpatient admissions at the hospital are up by 91 admits for the year in comparison to 2016.  There were also 31 swing bed admissions in May.

TCMH ended the month of May with a positive bottom line of $88,626.46 and a positive year to date bottom line of $52,617.31.

Present at the meeting were Todd-Willis; Pamperien; Turpin; Joleen Senter Durham, public relations director; Dr. Jonathan Beers, TCMH chief of staff; and board members Dr. Jim Perry, OD; Mark Hampton; Jay Loveland; Janet Wiseman, and Omanez Fockler.

The next meeting of the TCMH board of trustees is Tue., July 25 at 12 p.m. in the hospital board room.


Annual Golf Tournament Raises $19,167 for Healthcare Foundation

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Third place and first place winners of the Championship Flight at the tournament–Roger Tune and Aaron Hawkins, 3rd place winners and Ryan Potts and Lance King, 1st place winners.

The Texas County Memorial Hospital Healthcare Foundation raised $19,167 in cash and non-cash gifts at the Twelfth Annual Charitable Golf Tournament at Oakwood Golf Course in Houston on Sat., June 10.

Thirty-seven teams participated in the 18-hole two-person scramble which had 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. tee times.

Prizes were awarded to the top three teams in four categories—Championship Flight; A-Flight; B-Flight and C-Flight.  With a hole-in-one on hole five at the course, golfers had the opportunity to win $25,000 sponsored by Justin Shelby, State Farm Insurance Agent in Houston.

Winners of the Championship Flight all shot a score of 60.  Tie breaker rules were enforced for teams shooting the same score. First in Championship Flight went to Lance King and Ryan Potts, followed by Jon Williams and Greg Smith in second place, and Roger Tune and Aaron Hawkins in third place.

A-Flight winners were Ron Barton and Jordan Norfalise in first place with a 64, followed by Roger Tune and Denna Tune in second with a 65.  Third place winners, Gary Clinton and Kelly Lowe, also shot a 65.

Winners of the B-Flight were Jay Loveland and Lynn Loveland with a 70.  Finishing second were Preston Wade and Devin Wiseman with a 71.  Also with a 71 but coming in third were Ralph Pennington and Tanner Carter.

C-Flight winners were Scott Crump and Chuck Hicks with a 75.  Bill Hartwig and Chris Nelson also shot a 75 but came in second place.  Danny Lansdown and Dr. Lynn Hauenstein finished third with a 76.

First and second place winners in all flights received cash prizes and trophies.  Third place winners in all flights received a cash prize.

Mary Armstrong and Gary Lee were the women’s and men’s longest putt contest winners.

Men’s and women’s longest drive winners were Roger Tune and Denna Tune.

A “Vegas Par 3” closest to the pin contest was hosted and sponsored by Dr. Jim Perry, OD.  Preston Wade and Kelly Lowe won the contest.

“The Big Advantage” on the fourth hole allowed golfers to move up within 150 yards of the putting green and was sponsored by Wehr Ford/Wehr RV in Mountain Grove.  The game could reduce golf scores and included a closest to the pin contest.  John Williams was “The Big Advantage” winner.

Jay Gentry, TCMH Healthcare Foundation director, noted that the funds generated by the golf tournament will be used to fund scholarships for healthcare related educational fields and to provide resources for capital projects.

“We almost filled all of the available team slots, and we received numerous sponsorships from individuals and businesses for the tournament,” Gentry said.  “Both factors help make a great tournament.”

Gentry noted that the tournament also received corporate sponsorships from Emergency Medical Care, LLC; Home State Health; Missouri Foundation for Health, and USA Radiology Management along with support from many other businesses.

“The sponsorships and support also allow us to put on a tournament with a lot of amenities for the participants,” Gentry said.  He also thanked the numerous volunteers and the staff at Oakwood for their time and efforts on behalf of the Foundation’s tournament.

“Some of our winners also donated their winnings back to the Foundation, which we greatly appreciate,” Gentry said.  “The Foundation is a local charity and all of the money we receive for the Foundation will remain in the county.”

The TCMH Healthcare Foundation is the non-profit organization with a mission to ensure the quality of healthcare services for children, women, and men at Texas County Memorial Hospital.   Funding for the Foundation comes from grateful patients and their families, community members and groups, and businesses that value healthcare in our area.  A board of community leaders from across the county directs the TCMH Healthcare Foundation and the funds held by the Foundation.

“Once again, this tournament has been very successful for the Healthcare Foundation,” Gentry said.

The TCMH Healthcare Foundation plans to hold the golf tournament fundraiser again in 2018.


20 Years of Excellent Ratings for Mammography at TCMH

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TCMH added digital mammography in 2013 with the completion of a major expansion that included a new radiology department. Shown here with the digital mammography machine are two technologists that are trained in mammography, Lori Dailing and Terri Bailey.

The Texas County Memorial Hospital mammography department has again received a “zero deficiency” rating from the Mammogram Quality Standard Act (MQSA) for digital mammography done by the department.

This is the twentieth consecutive year the department has received a flawless rating in the state and federal survey.  Ann Hamilton, TCMH radiology department director, noted that it is “virtually unheard of” to be deficiency free for so many years.

Over half the survey time was spent inspecting paperwork collected in the mammography department.  Hamilton complimented Terri Bailey, technologist in the mammography department, for her role in compiling paperwork.

“Terri’s precise record keeping is one of the main reasons we continue to receive excellent ratings,” Hamilton said.

The mammography technologists, interpreting radiologist and physicist are required to have mammography specific continuing education annually.  Quality assurance testing is performed on the equipment daily, weekly and monthly, and the medical physicist performs an annual review of the mammography unit.

The TCMH radiology department offers the complete range of radiologic services—CT, digital mammography, MRI, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, bone density scan and x-ray.  The radiology department upgraded almost all of the departmental equipment in 2013 when the new department opened as part of the hospital expansion.

The radiology department at TCMH is open 24-hours a day.


Leslie Mahan is Employee of the Month

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Leslie Mahan (right), TCMH May employee of the month, with Kim Jordan, surgery manager.

Texas County Memorial Hospital has named Leslie Mahan of Hartshorn the May employee of the month.

Mahan is a registered nurse in the surgery department at TCMH where she has worked for 17 years.  Mahan was nominated for the award by her supervisor, Kim Jordan, surgery department director.

“Leslie is my ‘right hand’ when I am away from my department, and she’s a trustworthy person that won’t let you down,” Jordan said, describing Mahan as “reliable”.

“Leslie has great organizational skills, and she’s done a lot for our department in the ordering of supplies, in maintaining doctor’s preference sheets and in managing the call schedule,” Jordan said.

Jordan noted that Mahan has “great rapport” with all patients, particularly outpatient surgical patients that come in to TCMH regularly for treatments.

As employee of the month,  Mahan received a certificate honoring her achievement; a pin; a special parking place in the TCMH lot; one day of paid vacation; a $50 gift card, and gift certificates to Paws N Claws, D&L Florist; Blissful Nirvana Massage, Wehr Motors, and Savor Grill.  A reception will be held at the hospital in honor of Mahan.

Mahan is eligible for the 2017 TCMH employee of the year award.


Kawasaki Mule Raffle to Benefit Hospice of Care

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The Kawasaki Mule to be raffled at the 2017 Chili Cook Off with Kathy Wiley, S&H Farm Supply; Jay Gentry, TCMH Healthcare Foundation director; Stephen Darnell, S&H Farm Supply, and Wes Murray, TCMH CEO.

The Texas County Memorial Hospital Healthcare Foundation recently received a 2017 Kawasaki Mule to raffle for the Hospice of Care fund which benefits area Hospice of Care patients.

The utility vehicle will be awarded to a winner on November 4th at 3 p.m. at the TCMH Healthcare Foundation’s annual Chili Cook Off which also benefits Hospice of Care.

“We always have a large item with raffle tickets for our chili cook off teams to use to raise funds for their team, and this year we partnered with S&H Farm Supply in Mountain Grove for the all-terrain, utility vehicle,” Jay Gentry, Healthcare Foundation director, said.

The Kawasaki Mule is a 4X4 SX XC model with an $8,400 value. A donation by S&H and Kawasaki covered much of the unit’s cost.  Tickets are raffled for $10 each or $50 for six tickets.

“We have always had a great response when we raffle any type of all-terrain vehicle,” Courtney Owens, Hospice of Care director, explained.  “The Mule is really versatile for leisure or work, for small or large properties, so it appeals to everyone.”

Owens explained that the UTV is currently parked at TCMH if anyone wants to see it.

The TCMH Healthcare Foundation and Hospice of Care have a fundraising goal of $50,000 for the 2017 Chili Cook Off, and proceeds from the raffle ticket sales will go toward overall fundraising for the event.

Funds from the Healthcare Foundation’s Hospice Fund and the annual Chili Cook Off are utilized to provide end of life care for patients and their families regardless of a patient’s ability to pay for the service.

“Our hospice funds are used locally to benefit the patients we serve within a 40-mile radius of TCMH,” Owens said.

Raffle tickets for the Kawasaki Mule are available through the Hospice of Care office located in the TCMH Office Annex and any of the teams that are participating in this year’s cook off.

Space is still available for additional five-person cook off teams, according to Owens.

For additional information about raffle tickets or a 2017 Chili Cook Off team, contact Hospice of Care at (417) 967-1279 or 1-866-967-3311 ext. 1279.


Changes to State Medicaid Program Present Challenges

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Changes to the state Medicaid program for women and children present challenges for the recipients as well as the clinics and hospital, Texas County Memorial Hospital board members heard at their monthly meeting on May 23rd at TCMH.

As of May 1st, all Medicaid recipients in the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)–the portion of the state Medicaid program benefiting pregnant women and children–were automatically enrolled in a new managed Medicaid program administered by a secondary party contracted with by the state of Missouri. CHIP recipients were assigned to a specific healthcare provider and received new insurance cards listing the name of the new Primary Care Provider (PCP).

Wes Murray, TCMH chief executive officer, described the changes to CHIP as “confusion”.

“We have spent a lot of time working on this, and this transition period has created a lot of issues and questions and difficulties for our patients,” Murray said.

In order to provide care for patients under the new managed Medicaid program, TCMH was required to contract with one of three state chosen middle administrators for the program.  After spending months in negotiation with the secondary parties, TCMH contracted with Home State Plans.

“Most patients were just auto-assigned a new healthcare provider,” Linda Pamperien, TCMH chief financial officer, said. She explained that some of the healthcare providers assigned to area patients are no longer in practice in the area because they are retired or now practice elsewhere.

“Patients that were already established patients with our providers in our clinics are contacting our clinics and healthcare providers asking where they are supposed to go for care,” Pamperien said.

Most of the affected patients are pregnant women or children that require regular and routine healthcare.

“We are trying to work with the managed care company, but they are making it very difficult for our patients to receive routine healthcare,” Pamperien said.

Pamperien cited delays for patients to receive routine ultrasounds prior to 17 weeks, questioning of physician ordered hospital observation stays for pregnant patients, and questioning whether or not a patient needs a Cesaerean-section for a safe delivery.

“Pre-certifications are a nightmare,” Pamperien said. “The managed care plan wants the physician to personally call to get the patients pre-certified for healthcare services.”

Delays of routine healthcare services are common with the new plans. TCMH is also receiving 20 percent less reimbursement for the same services.

“Our goals have not changed; we are trying to provide the best care we can for our patients,” Murray said. “And we are also doing the same services with more work for less pay.”

TCMH has voiced their frustrations with the Missouri Hospital Association and a new “Medicaid compliance officer” employed by the state to ensure that the managed Medicaid companies provide the services they are contracted to provide.

Medicaid patients are able to change the PCP they were assigned to.  There is also a process for Medicaid patients to change their managed Medicaid insurance provider.

Medicaid patients with Home State Health Plans are able to use any TCMH healthcare provider because the hospital and TCMH clinics in Licking, Houston, Cabool, and Mountain Grove and TCMH Home Health of the Ozarks contract with Home State Health Plans for managed Medicaid services. Home Health of the Ozarks is also contracted with MO Care for managed Medicaid.

Currently, Missouri Medicaid recipients who are aged, blind or disabled, including those with developmental disabilities served through the Missouri Department of Mental Health, are not included in the managed care system and will continue to receive services through the traditional MO HealthNet program administered by the state of Missouri.

In new business, Murray presented MHA data showing the hospital’s area economic impact.

In 2016 TCMH had $17,593,321 in salaries in benefits for 315 full-time equivalent employees. According to the MHA, one full-time hospital job has a 1.63 employment impact multiplier, creating 0.63 jobs in another industry in the area.

“Our 315 FTEs create an additional 198 jobs in the area,” Murray said.

The data showed that the $17.6 million payroll in 2016 has a $5.8 million secondary income impact on other businesses and industries in the area.

“This indirect impact is created by our employees spending money in the community,” Murray said, adding, “We have a total direct, indirect and induced employee compensation impact of $23.4 million on our local area.”

Murray recently met with members of the Houston city council for a hospital tour.  The hospital’s economic impact on the city of Houston was also discussed.

“We know what we do for our area from a healthcare perspective,” Murray said, “But the overall economic impact is often overlooked.”

Dr. Jim Perry, chairperson of the TCMH board of trustees and longtime ophthalmologist and business owner in Cabool, noted that TCMH is frequently thought of as an “always here” business in the community that is taken for granted.

“Just because the hospital is a long tenured business in the county doesn’t mean it will always be here,” Perry said. “The hospital’s impact on all area businesses is not fully realized.”

Murray reported that he recently met at Cox College of Nursing in Springfield with school officials and members of the state department of economic development.

Cox College is seeking a grant from the state to grow the school’s nursing program by an additional 50 students and to renovate the training facilities and classroom capabilities located at Cox North in Springfield.

“Our current nursing turnover at 16 percent is higher than it’s been in recent history, and it’s lower than the state and national averages,” Murray said.

The aging population in the US and particularly in rural America indicates needs for more nurses in the future, too.

Although Cox College of Nursing is located in Springfield, TCMH believes that increasing nursing enrollment in the region will increase the numbers of nurses available to work at TCMH.

Ron Prenger, CoxHealth representative, thanked Murray for his support of their grant efforts.  Prenger explained that Cox College is the only nursing program in the area that is currently seeking enrollment growth.

“We have to have the support of the rural hospitals in our area to receive this grant,” Prenger said.

Turnover for nurses at CoxHealth is higher than at TCMH, and both hospitals cite healthcare facilities offering large sign-on bonuses to recruit nurses and traveling nursing agencies offering higher rates of pay as the main sources for nursing turnover in their respective hospitals.

If the grant is received, Cox College plans to have additional nurses trained and ready to work in about three years.

“The nursing shortage is a growing problem that doesn’t need to grow anymore,” Murray said.

Hospital inpatient and outpatient revenues dropped below below budgeted expectations for the month of April, according to Pamperien’s monthly financial report.

Inpatient admissions at the hospital are up by 88 admits for the year in comparison to 2016, but in April emergency department volume dropped and swing bed admissions dropped.

“The ER drives a lot of our outpatient revenues,” Pamperien explained.

TCMH ended the month of April with a negative bottom line of $243,967.83 and a negative year to date bottom line of $36,009.15.

Present at the meeting were Murray; Pamperien; Prenger; Doretta Todd-Willis, chief nursing officer; Joleen Senter Durham, public relations director; Amanda Turpin, quality management director; Dr. Jonathan Beers, TCMH chief of staff; and board members Perry; Mark Hampton; Jay Loveland, and Omanez Fockler.

Board member, Janet Wiseman, was not present at the meeting.

The next meeting of the TCMH board of trustees is Tue., June 27 at 12 p.m. in the hospital board room.


Managed Medicaid Contracts in Place at TCMH for Area Patients

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Texas County Memorial Hospital and TCMH clinics located in Licking, Houston, Cabool and Mountain Grove have contracted with Home State Health Plans.

Home State Health Plans is a Managed Medicaid program to assist pregnant women and children covered under Childen’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).  As of May 1, all Medicaid recipients in the CHIP program were assigned to a healthcare provider and received new cards listing the new Primary Care Provider (PCP).

According to Home State Health, patients aren’t locked into the PCP listed on the card.  Patients are allowed to see any provider that is contracted with Home State Health Plans, which includes all of the TCMH healthcare providers.

Patients are allowed to change their Managed Medicaid plan to utilize a TCMH provider if they are not already in a Home State Health plan.  Patients must make the change to Home State within 90 days by calling 1-800-348-6627.

Those who are aged, blind or disabled, including those with developmental disabilities served through the Missouri Department of Mental Health, are not included in the managed care system and will continue to receive services through the traditional MO HealthNet program administered by the state of Missouri.

TCMH Home Health of the Ozarks is contracted with Home State Health Plans and with MO Care for their patients that are included in the new managed care services.

For additional information about Medicaid services and healthcare providers at TCMH, contact Anita Kuhn, TCMH controller, (417) 967-1277


Terri Bailey is Employee of the Month

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Terri Bailey (left) with Ann Hamilton, radiology director.

Texas County Memorial Hospital has named Terri Bailey of Bucyrus the April employee of the month.

Bailey is a technologist in the radiology department at TCMH, and she has worked in the department for over 35 years.  Bailey was nominated for the award by her supervisor, Ann Hamilton, radiology department director.

“Terri maintains precise accurate records for our federal mammography quality and accreditation requirements, and with her help we have ‘zero deficiencies’ every year in our surveys,” Hamilton said, describing Bailey’s work as “amazing”.

“Terri’s primary responsibility is mammography, and we have patients that request Terri when they schedule their annual mammogram,” Hamilton said.

Hamilton noted that Bailey is trained to work in multiple modalities in the department, and she doesn’t hesitate to help out with other radiology department needs when needed.

This is Bailey’s second time to receive employee of the month honors at TCMH.  Bailey was also employee of the month in June 2004.

As employee of the month, Bailey received a certificate honoring her achievement; a pin; a special parking place in the TCMH lot; one day of paid vacation; a $50 gift card, and gift certificates to Paws N Claws, D&L Florist; Blissful Nirvana Massage, Wehr Motors, and Savor Grill.  A reception will be held at the hospital in honor of Bailey.

Bailey is eligible for the 2017 TCMH employee of the year award.


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