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New Trustee Joins Hospital Board

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Dr. Jim Perry, OD, chair of the Texas County Memorial Hospital board of trustees, administers the oath of office to the newest TCMH board member, Jay Loveland.

Dr. Jim Perry, OD, chair of the Texas County Memorial Hospital board of trustees, administers the oath of office to the newest TCMH board member, Jay Loveland.

Jay Loveland of Mountain Grove was sworn in as a member of the Texas County Memorial Hospital board of trustees at their monthly meeting on Tuesday.

Loveland was appointed to the hospital board by the Texas County Commission in February following the resignation of hospital board member, Russell Gaither, of Houston.  Loveland will fulfill the remainder of Gaither’s term.

Wes Murray, TCMH chief executive officer, welcomed Loveland.

“We are pleased to have you on the board and bringing representation from the Southern portion of Texas County to the board,” Murray said.

During lunch, before the board meeting was called to order, four hospital employees spoke with board members about Safe Training and Responsible Restraints (STARR), the workplace violence reduction training program that is underway at TCMH.

The four employees–Brandon Swindle, Angel Watkins, Shanda Melton and Frank Steelman–were in the group of employees that participated in the first round of STARR training at TCMH.

The two-day training program began with classroom training on verbal conflict resolution and de-escalation tactics, and the remainder of the class was hands on training in physical techniques designed to provide tools for escape from and control of people who are physically out of control.

Patty Neal, a clerk in the Texas County Memorial Hospital business office, and Bryan Kemnitzer, a technologist in the radiology department, practice physical techniques for escape and control under the  oversight of a trainer from Mitigation Dynamics.

Patty Neal, a clerk in the Texas County Memorial Hospital business office, and Bryan Kemnitzer, a technologist in the radiology department, practice physical techniques for escape and control under the oversight of a trainer from Mitigation Dynamics.

“The training provided us with an invaluable set of tools for healthcare or in life,” Swindle, an employee in the TCMH dietary department, said.

Melton, Watkins, and Steelman work in departments providing hands on patient care every day, and Steelman noted that in his job as a paramedic at TCMH has “been in situations like this”.

“The training was very interesting, and I have strong opinions about this type of training,” Steelman said.  “I definitely have some better tools to use going forward.”

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has created regulations for healthcare facilities to achieve a higher level of safety for patients, visitors, physicians, and staff.  TCMH plans to comply with the new regulations.

The Missouri Hospital Association (MHA) chose TCMH to participate in the STARR program along with other hospitals in the state.  Mitigation Dynamics in Lee’s Summit, MO is working with the MHA to train employees and to help participating hospitals put policies and procedures in place in their hospital.

Melton, a nurse in the TCMH medical surgical department, described the training as “empowering”.

“I would never have thought I could put my hands on someone to take control in a violent situation, but I have learned what to do,” Melton said.

Melton described a personal situation where she was verbally abused by a patient’s family member.

“The instructors were very motivating and positive, and now I know what do in situations like I’ve faced in the past,” Melton said.

Watkins, the obstetrics department nurse manager, described the STARR training as “challenging”.  “I wish I had this skill set 5 to 10 years ago,” Watkins said.

STARR training includes 16 hours of manual, classroom instruction, training repetition, proficiency testing, report writing, policy review and scenario-based drills.  Upon successful completion of the STARR training, the hospital staff received STARR certification.

In addition to STARR certification for 50 employees from a variety of hospital departments, TCMH has access to an “implementation toolbox” that will come with an Activation and Response Flow map, a certification card template, a financial proposal template and a Microsoft Access program.  The Access program can store end-user data and incident reporting data.  The program can track and generate workplace violence incident reports, track employee certification and generate reports about end-user in incident, physical restraint by technique, and more.

Murray called the STARR training “very beneficial” citing the safety aspect of the training for TCMH employees and the financial aspect for the hospital of losing employees that could be injured on the job or forced to leave a job they had trained for if they didn’t handle the violence appropriately.

In new business, board members unanimously approved a resolution regarding legislative strategies and proposals to release some or all of the Affordable Care Act and create new programs to replace it.

The resolution notes that Missouri hospitals have received reductions in payments and that the loss of health insurance coverage would increase the number of uninsured Missourians on top of providing over $1 billion in uncompensated care.

“Therefore, Texas County Memorial Hospital hereby goes on record to urge that if the Affordable Care Act’s expanded coverage disappears and is not replicated, hospital payment cuts must be repealed and a plan implemented to provide coverage to the uninsured,” the resolution stated.

“The Missouri Hospital Association asked us to join hospitals across the state in approving this resolution so that our federal lawmakers would know exactly where we stand on repealing or replacing some or all of the Affordable Care Act,” Murray said.

Murray noted that the US House of Representatives does not have an imminent vote on healthcare, but the resolution would be shared with federal legislators.

“Federal payments to hospitals were cut before ACA was put into place, and regardless of what happens with the ACA, federal legislators need to know that they risk the closure of hospitals in Missouri if they continue to place heavy financial burdens on our hospital,” Murray said.

Murray also presented additional information to board members that the MHA prepared and shared with federal legislators.  The information shows the high number of uninsured patients in rural Missouri as well as the higher number of patients with Medicare and Medicaid coverage located in rural Missouri.

“Whatever changes there are going forward, we want our legislators to be sure they are taking rural American hospitals into consideration,” Murray said.

Linda Pamperien, chief financial officer, presented financials for the months of January and February.

Inpatient volumes were up $639,514 above budgeted expectations in January—a five week month.  Increased outpatient revenue and decreased expenses and contractual adjustments left a positive monthly and year to date balance of $218,509.97.

February was a four-week month, and inpatient volumes were just up slightly above budgeted expectations.  Expenses were down for the month and outpatient revenue was also down for the month.  The contractual adjustment was higher in February.

TCMH ended the month of February with a negative bottom line of $120,659.38 and a year to date balance of $97,850.59.

“At the end of February we were up 72 inpatient admissions in comparison to last year, which is a very good way to start off the year,” Pamperien said.

Auditors from BKD, LLC of Springfield were on site during the month of March to provide specialized financial services and an annual audit for TCMH.  The results of the annual audit will be presented at the April board meeting.

Present at the meeting were Murray; Pamperien; Doretta Todd-Willis, chief nursing officer, Amanda Turpin, quality management nurse manager; Dr. Jonathan Beers, chief of staff; Joleen Senter Durham, director of public relations, and board members, Loveland; Omanez Fockler; Janet Wiseman; Mark Hampton, and Dr. Jim Perry, OD.

The next meeting of the TCMH board of trustees is Tue., April 25th at 12 p.m. in the hospital board room.


Healthcare Foundation Recognizes Giving Partners

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Wes Murray, CEO, thanked members of the Futures Team.

Wes Murray, CEO, thanked members of the Futures Team.

The Texas County Memorial Hospital Healthcare Foundation held a lunch on Friday and recognized hospital employee donors that have fulfilled or are close to fulfilling pledges as members of the “TCMH Futures Team”.  TCMH Futures Team members, past and present hospital employees, are responsible for donating $410,000 to the Healthcare Foundation’s capital campaign efforts over the past five years.

Sixty-three current hospital employees were members of the TCMH Futures Team receiving recognition.  Twenty-seven more recently hired employees have made pledges to the Healthcare Foundation as part of the 5N5 program that will continue beyond this spring.  Those members will be recognized in the future.

In 2012, Jay Gentry, TCMH Healthcare Foundation president, and members of the Healthcare Foundation board of directors, rolled out a “5N5” donor campaign asking employees to pledge donations to the “Care for Your Future” capital campaign over five years or less. Over 100 employees made one-time donations or pledged regular donations through payroll or paid time off deductions.

“We had people drop out of the program over time because they left TCMH due to retirement or job changes, and we picked up new employee members along the way, too,” Gentry said.

Gentry explained that many employees that were part of the 5N5 program have continued to give to the Healthcare Foundation even after their pledge period ended.

Wes Murray, TCMH chief executive officer, cites a “giving culture” at TCMH.

“Whether it’s giving to help out an employee in a crisis situation or giving to help out a local organization such as Ozark Action or the Texas County Food Pantry, TCMH employees set the bar for giving,” Murray said.

Murray noted that employee interest in improving the hospital’s infrastructure and growing primary care services is strong.

“Our employees believe in and want to see new patient care areas throughout the hospital,” Murray said.

There are several employees at TCMH that are second and third generation employees that work at the hospital.

“Many of our employees view TCMH as a place where their children may work someday, and they definitely believe the hospital will care for them and their families in the future,” Murray said.

“Our employees know that TCMH is dedicated to the patients, the employees and the communities we serve,” Murray said, adding, “And the employees are proud to reciprocate that dedication by stepping up and committing to building for our community’s future healthcare and employment needs.”

A sample brick for the donors that fulfilled their pledges as members of the TCMH 5N5 capital campaign donors.

A sample brick for the donors that fulfilled their pledges as members of the TCMH 5N5 capital campaign donors.

Gentry gave everyone a T-shirt at the event, too.

Gentry gave everyone a T-shirt at the event, too.

In addition to the lunch for the employee donors, the Healthcare Foundation is honoring the employees that fulfilled their pledge with an engraved brick as part of the brick paver project currently underway by the Healthcare Foundation.

“These employees have made a lasting gift to their hospital. We want to honor them in a way that is remembered for many years, too,” Gentry said.

Gentry explained that additional signage inside the department will recognize donors in the new surgery area when it is complete.

Twenty-six employees, past and present, have given $3,000 or more, earning them a spot on the Healthcare Foundation’s Tree of Life, a donor recognition tree located in a main lobby of the hospital.

The surgery department shell at TCMH has been completed, but interior work—operating rooms, recovery rooms, a waiting area, staff dressing rooms, and other related spaces are currently in the process of being built.  TCMH has donations from private donors, tax credits and a grant from the Delta Region Authority to help with the project, but funds are still being raised for specialized equipment the department will need.

“Several of the 5N5 employee donor partners have continued to give to the Foundation, requesting that funds go toward the construction and equipment needs for the surgery department,” Gentry said.

Gentry added, “Many employees do not want the construction at TCMH to stop until the hospital reaches its ultimate goal of having all new patient care areas.”

Once the surgery department is complete, TCMH plans to renovate the original surgery area and the intensive care unit and obstetrics department to give both departments more patient space.

The Healthcare Foundation continues to accept private donations and seek grant funding for capital improvements at the hospital.

For additional information about the TCMH Healthcare Foundation, contact Gentry at jgentry@tcmh.org or 1-866-967-3311.

Members of the TCMH Futures Team have donated $410,000 to capital improvements at TCMH over the past five years.

Members of the TCMH Futures Team have donated $410,000 to capital improvements at TCMH over the past five years.

 


Romines Ford Partnering with Community to Raise $6,000 for TCMH by Drive 4 UR Community

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2017 D4URC LogoRomines Ford in Houston is bringing Ford Motor Company’s Drive 4 UR Community Program to Houston on April 22nd in an effort to raise up to $6,000 for Texas County Memorial Hospital.

For every person who takes the wheel and test-drives a new Ford vehicle at Romines, Ford Motor will donate $20 to the TCMH Healthcare Foundation to raise funds for a new blanket warmer for the new surgery department under construction at TCMH.

Drive 4 UR Community will be held at Romines Ford on Saturday, April 22 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.   Participants must be 18 or older and have a valid driver’s license.  There is a limit of one test-drive per household or address. Sign up and test drive will last approximately 10 minutes.

Healthcare providers from TCMH will be available at Romines providing free healthcare information and blood pressure checks to those that come by for the test-drive.  TCMH will also provide lunch between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. that day, too.

“We consider the hospital to be a vital part of our area economy, and we want to do our part to help the hospital grow and continue to provide excellent healthcare services to our area,” Don Romines, owner of Romines Ford, said.  “We’re excited to raise money for TCMH.”

Drive 4 UR Community, designed to help raise much needed funding for local community groups and nonprofit organizations, is very similar in concept to Ford’s successful Drive 4 UR School initiative. To date, Ford dealerships across the United States have helped raised more than $35 million for local schools and non-profits thanks to their hard work and partnership with the Drive 4 UR School and Drive 4 UR Community programs.

“We are very excited about the opportunity that Romines Ford and Ford Motor Company have provided to us,” Wes Murray, TCMH chief executive officer, said.  “Drive 4 UR Community is a unique way to raise funds by asking our community to just give a few minutes of their time to benefit their local hospital.”

Several different vehicles from the Ford lineup will be available at Drive 4 UR Community.

“Whether you are looking to test out our fuel efficiency vehicles, like the Focus, or want to try out technology features like Active Park Assist in the Escape, we will be able to put you behind the wheel of your favorite Ford vehicle,” said Romines.

Dealership staff on site will be able to assist with all Ford vehicles and provide additional information about each vehicle available for test-drive if requested.

For additional information about Drive 4 UR Community contact Romines Ford at (417) 967-4134.


Matching Funds Help TCMH Healthcare Foundation Grow Endowed Scholarship

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Progressive Ozark Bank made a $1000 donation to the TCMH Healthcare Foundation Youth Ambassador Endowed Scholarship Fund which will be matched by Community Foundation of the Ozarks at Give Ozarks Day in May.  Shown here with the ceremonial check are, left to right, Sherry Jones, Progressive Ozark Bank; Megan Morland, youth ambassador; Wes Murray, TCMH CEO; Marissa Matthews, youth ambassador; Jay Gentry, TCMH Healthcare Foundation; Winter Hardwick, youth ambassador, and Earleen Holder, Progressive Ozark Bank.

Progressive Ozark Bank made a $1000 donation to the TCMH Healthcare Foundation Youth Ambassador Endowed Scholarship Fund which will be matched by Community Foundation of the Ozarks at Give Ozarks Day in May. Shown here with the ceremonial check are, left to right, Sherry Jones, Progressive Ozark Bank; Megan Morland, youth ambassador; Wes Murray, TCMH CEO; Marissa Matthews, youth ambassador; Jay Gentry, TCMH Healthcare Foundation; Winter Hardwick, youth ambassador, and Earleen Holder, Progressive Ozark Bank.

The Texas County Memorial Hospital Healthcare Foundation Youth Ambassador Endowed Scholarship Fund has the opportunity to grow by at least another $10,000 this spring thanks to a matching challenge grant from Community Foundation of the Ozarks (CFO) to benefit affiliate endowments.

The Healthcare Foundation was one of 20 CFO affiliates selected to participate in the program that will match every dollar given up to $5,000.  Progressive Ozark Bank in Houston and Orscheln Farm and Home have already donated funds to the Healthcare Foundation that will be matched by CFO this year.

The Healthcare Foundation started the Youth Ambassador Endowed Scholarship Fund in 2015 in part through a matching challenge grant from CFO and through “Give Ozarks”, a 24-hour day of giving organized by CFO.  The Healthcare Foundation continued to raise funds for the scholarship fund through Give Ozarks, bringing the scholarship fund balance to over $20,000 in the past two years.

“As the fund has grown, we have been able to increase the number of scholarships given annually to two scholarships, and the amount of the scholarships has also grown,” Jay Gentry, TCMH Healthcare Foundation director, said.

In 2016, the Healthcare Foundation awarded two scholarships—one $250 and one $500—to two Youth Ambassadors.  With additional funds, Gentry noted that the scholarship amounts could be raised to $750 and $500 annually.

Gentry is currently working to secure the $5,000 match by the first week of May, but the Healthcare Foundation also plans to participate in “Give Ozarks”, the 24-hour day of giving organized by CFO for Tuesday, May 9th to add to the endowment funds.

“In addition to the major donations we’ve already received for the project, other donor partners are also stepping up to meet the challenge and partner in the endowed scholarship project,” Gentry said, adding,  “This is a great opportunity to make a long-lasting impact in the lives of area students.”

The Healthcare Foundation is one of several area entities that are participating in Give Ozarks in 2017.

Give Ozarks is a one-day surge across the state of Missouri that is part of the national “Give Local America Day”.  With the assistance of CFO, donors will be able to make online donations at www.giveozarks.org to the Healthcare Foundation and to the Houston Education Foundation.

CFO will match donations made that day up to $5,000, and they have additional matching funds and prizes available to organizations that rally donors to participate in the 24-hour day of giving.

“We are excited about creating an endowed scholarship for the TCMH Youth Ambassadors,” Gentry said.  “The Youth Ambassadors have volunteered over 375 hours at TCMH since September of this year, and they are an important resource at TCMH.”

Orscheln Farm and Home made a $500 donation to the TCMH Healthcare Foundation Youth Ambassador Endowed Scholarship Fund which will be matched by Community Foundation of the Ozarks at Give Ozarks Day in May.  Shown here with the ceremonial check are left to right: Wes Murray, TCMH CEO; Mike Rodr, Orscheln district manager; Jeannie Goins, Orscheln Houston store manager, and Jay Gentry, TCMH Healthcare Foundation director.

Orscheln Farm and Home made a $500 donation to the TCMH Healthcare Foundation Youth Ambassador Endowed Scholarship Fund which will be matched by Community Foundation of the Ozarks at Give Ozarks Day in May. Shown here with the ceremonial check are left to right: Wes Murray, TCMH CEO; Mike Rodr, Orscheln district manager; Jeannie Goins, Orscheln Houston store manager, and Jay Gentry, TCMH Healthcare Foundation director.

The Youth Ambassador program at TCMH allows selected area high school juniors and seniors and college students to volunteer in hospital departments for medical experience.  Volunteer duties include passing out fresh linens and filling ice water cups for patients on the medical surgical floors, rocking newborns and greeting visitors in the obstetrics department, and reading to and talking with patients in the hospital’s swing bed program.

With the Youth Ambassador Endowed Scholarship Fund, eligible Youth Ambassadors have the opportunity annually to receive a scholarship toward higher education.

Funds donated to the TCMH Healthcare Foundation are tax-deductible.  For funds to be matched by CFO for the Healthcare Foundation’s endowed scholarship program, donations must be made online on May 9th or in the Healthcare Foundation’s hands by April 28, 2017.

For additional information, contact Gentry at (417) 967-1377 or jay.gentry@tcmh.org.


Bailey Walker is Employee of the Month

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:  Bailey Walker is the Texas County Memorial Hospital February employee of the month, and she’s here with her supervisor, John Sawyer.

: Bailey Walker is the Texas County Memorial Hospital February employee of the month, and she’s here with her supervisor, John Sawyer.

Texas County Memorial Hospital has named Bailey Walker of Pottersville the February employee of the month.

Walker is a licensed practical nurse in the medical surgical department at TCMH, and she has worked in the department for a year.  Walker was nominated for the award by her supervisor, John Sawyer, med surg department director.

“Bailey is a very positive influence on the night shift in our department,” Sawyer said, explaining that Walker’s performance is like that of a nurse with 20 years experience.

“Bailey helps hold things together when she works, and she is willing to help out in anyway with any patient,” Sawyer said.

Sawyer described Walker as “priceless”, bringing invaluable teamwork and enthusiasm for patient care to the department.

As employee of the month, Walker received a certificate honoring her achievement; a pin; a special parking place in the TCMH lot; one day of paid vacation; a $50 gift card, and gift certificates to Paws N Claws, D&L Florist; Blissful Nirvana Massage, Wher Motors, and Savor Grill.  A reception will be held at the hospital in honor of Walker.

Walker is eligible for the 2017 TCMH employee of the year award.


Murray Elected Southwest District Council President

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Wesley Murray, TCMH CEO

Wesley Murray, TCMH CEO

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Wesley E. Murray, CEO of Texas County Memorial Hospital in Houston, Mo., was elected to a one-year term as President of the Missouri Hospital Association’s Southwest District Council. His term began Jan. 1.

As District Council President, Murray’s responsibilities include presiding over council meetings and guiding discussions on association policies and activities. One of six MHA district council presidents, he will direct input from council members on national, state and regional health care policies to the MHA Board of Trustees.

“We are pleased to have someone with Wes’ experience assume this important leadership role,” said Herb B. Kuhn, MHA President and CEO.

Murray, who has served as CEO of Texas County Memorial Hospital since 2003, has spent his career working in healthcare. He is a 2005 recipient of the Missouri Hospital Association Visionary Leadership Award.

Under his leadership, gross revenues at TCMH have doubled to over $65 million. Murray has overseen the growth of the TCMH Healthcare Foundation which has raised over $24 million to benefit healthcare needs in Texas County and the surrounding area.

The hospital is currently constructing a new surgery department, and a $19 million, 56,000 square foot expansion of the emergency room and medical surgical departments was completed in 2013. Murray has also been involved in the growth of primary care services including new clinic and ambulance services, a sleep studies laboratory, a pulmonary rehabilitation clinic, non-emergency transportation and a community safe room.

Murray resides in Houston with his wife, Judy.

The Missouri Hospital Association is a not-for-profit association in Jefferson City that represents 145 Missouri hospitals. In addition to representation and advocacy on behalf of its membership, the association offers continuing education programs on current health care topics and seeks to educate the public about health care issues.


EMT-Basic Class to Begin at TCMH

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An emergency medical technician basic (EMT) program begins at Texas County Memorial Hospital on Tuesday, April 4th. EMS DAY 058

The 16-week course will be held each Tuesday and Thursday evening from 6 to 10 p.m. in the Timmons Education Room at the hospital.  The cost of the program is $600 which covers educational materials for the program.

The class is limited to 12 students.

“We have a need for more EMTs at TCMH,” Bill Bridges, TCMH emergency medical services director, said.  “We are hopeful that this class will help us train some area residents that might be suited to work at TCMH.”

TCMH uses EMTs in the emergency department at the hospital and on the hospital ambulance service.

To register for the EMT basic program, contact Bridges at (417) 967-1385 or 1-888-967-3311.


Hospice of Care Training for New Volunteers

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Texas County Memorial Hospital Hospice of Care will provide training for new Hospice of Care volunteers on Fri., March 17th. Holding Hands with Elderly Patient

The training session is from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. in the downstairs meeting room at TCMH.

Hospice of Care depends on volunteers to meet the needs of terminally ill patients and their families.  Volunteers provide direct services to patients as well as indirect services that support Hospice of Care staff with daily operations.

Sandy Eaton, a licensed practical nurse with Hospice of Care, is the volunteer coordinator for the group.  Anyone with questions about the training or volunteer work can contact Eaton at (417) 967-1279 or 1-888-967-3311.

Hospice of Care is a non-profit organization that offers care for the terminally ill.  They assist in providing hospice care, supplies and equipment for patients and their families in Texas County and surrounding areas.


TCMH Begins DAISY Award to Recognize Extraordinary Nurses

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The DAISY Award-Logo-OLTexas County Memorial Hospital rolled out a new nurse recognition program, this week.  The DAISY (Diseases Attacking the Immune System) Award is an international recognition program that honors and celebrates the skilled and compassionate care provided by nurses every day.

The DAISY Award is part of the non-profit DAISY Foundation of Glen Ellen, CA.  The Foundation was established by the family of J. Patrick Barnes.  Patrick died at the age of 33 in late 1999 from complications of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), a little known but not uncommon auto-immune disease.

The care Patrick and his family received from nurses while Patrick was ill and hospitalized inspired the DAISY Award as a way of thanking nurses for making a profound difference in the lives of their patients and patient families.

“When Patrick was critically ill, our family experienced first-hand the remarkable skill and care nurses provide patients every day and night. Yet these unsung heroes are seldom recognized for the super-human work they do,” Bonnie Barnes, President and Co-Founder of The DAISY Foundation, said.

In the past, TCMH has recognized one nurse annually with a “nurse of the year” award, and the DAISY Award program will replace the annual nursing honor.  TCMH hopes give out one DAISY Award to a nurse in the spring, and one DAISY Award to a nurse in the fall.

“The kind of work the nurses at TCMH are called on to do every day epitomizes the purpose of The DAISY Award,” Doretta Todd Willis, TCMH chief nursing officer, said.

TCMH has nurses that work in a variety of settings from hospital inpatient departments to clinics and home health and hospice services.

“All of our nursing staff has the opportunity to provide extraordinary care to our patients and their family members, and we hope that patients, family members, and visitors to our hospital will take the time to share their story and nominate a nurse for a DAISY award,” Todd Willis said.

The public is invited to submit personal experiences with TCMH nursing staff for the DAISY Award.

TCMH has DAISY Award nomination forms available in various departments around the hospital and clinics, including the front desk at the hospital.  The nomination form is also available online.

The nomination form asks for information about the specific act of extraordinary care that was experienced by the person making the nomination.  The person completing the form is also asked to provide contact information should more information about the act be needed.

DAISY awards will be evaluated twice annually, and one DAISY award will be given at each evaluation period.  All nurses that are nominated for a DAISY Award will receive recognition.

The nurse that receives the DAISY Award will be recognized at a public ceremony in his or her department.  The award recipient will also receive a special DAISY Award pin; a recognition certificate, and a hand-carved stone sculpture called “A Healer’s Touch”.

As part of the DAISY Award ceremony, the department will celebrate with cinnamon rolls.  During Patrick Barnes’ hospitalization, he requested Cinnabon cinnamon rolls, a personal favorite food.  He shared them with his nursing staff.  Today the DAISY Foundation includes cinnamon rolls with DAISY Award ceremonies in tribute to Barnes love of the sweet treat.

“We are proud to be among the healthcare organizations participating in the DAISY Award program,” Todd Willis said.  “It’s important that TCMH nurses know their work is highly valued, and The DAISY Foundation provides a way for us to do that.”

A complete listing of healthcare facilities that participate in the DAISY Award program can be found here.

For additional information about the DAISY Award, contact TCMH Nursing Administration at (417) 967-3311.


Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Program Gives Life Back to Area Patients

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The Cardiopulmonary Rehab Clinic at Texas County Memorial Hospital is located at the end of the East Wing of the hospital

The Cardiopulmonary Rehab Clinic at Texas County Memorial Hospital is located at the end of the East Wing of the hospital

The East Wing of the hospital is abuzz with activity these days.

The new Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Clinic is located in the four rooms at the end of a hospital that has been mostly quiet since the new medical surgical floor was built at Texas County Memorial Hospital.

Three former patient rooms and a staff break room on the wing have been converted into a waiting area, a reception area, and two treatment rooms for the patients in cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation at TCMH.

Monday, Wednesday and Friday, the hallway hums with the sound of treadmills, recumbent cross training machines, hand pedaling machines, conversation, instruction and occasional laughter.    Tuesdays and Thursdays are a bit quieter in the East hallway as Matt Eskew, a respiratory therapist, and Kathy Carr, a registered nurse, complete patient charting and related paperwork and conduct new patient evaluations.

Cardiac rehabilitation has long been a part of the outpatient services available at TCMH, but with the addition of the pulmonary rehabilitation program, a complete clinical space was created for both programs.

Dr. Juan Mella, a board certified pulmonologist, joined TCMH in June 2016.  Mella asked TCMH to begin a pulmonary rehabilitation program to benefit area patients with lung disorders.

TCMH was able to make Mella’s request a reality with a $357,000 grant from Missouri Foundation for Health (MFH). The Missouri Foundation for Health is an independent philanthropic foundation dedicated to improving the health of the uninsured and underserved in the region.

The TCMH grant was part of $3,790,941 awarded by MFH to 10 different projects in one of three “special projects” funding cycles by MFH in 2016. The MFH grant funds are given to TCMH over a three year period.

The grant funds allow TCMH to cover wages for a full-time respiratory therapist, wages for a part-time administrative support staff member, equipment for the program, transportation expenses for some patients, patient counseling sessions, and smoking cessation products for some program participants.

A patient qualifies for the multi-disciplinary cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program following testing for lung disease.  The goal of the 12-week program is to help a patient improve lung function and activities of daily living.

Mella oversees the cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program and the patients taking part in the program.

Prior to beginning the cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program, the TCMH respiratory therapy department had statistics showing that over half the patients receiving pulmonary function tests at TCMH in the past year would qualify for a pulmonary rehabilitation program because they have moderate to severe lung disease.

Doris Skaggs, the first patient in the new cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program at Texas County Memorial Hospital, exercises on the treadmill under the supervision of Matt Eskew, respiratory therapist.

Doris Skaggs, the first patient in the new cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program at Texas County Memorial Hospital, exercises on the treadmill under the supervision of Matt Eskew, respiratory therapist.

Doris Skaggs of Willow Springs was the first patient to take part in the program.  Skaggs was a patient of Mella’s prior to beginning the program.  Skaggs suffers from bronchiectasis and pulmonary fibrosis, a long-term lung inflammation that was worsened by lupus.

“I’ve had lung problems for 35 to 40 years, and before doing this program, I didn’t have the strength to do much of anything,” Skaggs said.

Skaggs began the program in December, and she has already noticed improvement in what she’s able to do on a daily basis.

While recently doing her exercises under Eskew’s supervision in the clinic, Skaggs made arrangements with Eskew to change her appointment time.  Eskew explained that she was planning to host her nephew and his wife at her home.

“I was able to make pies and get their bedroom ready,” Skaggs said, adding, “I couldn’t have done that at all two months ago.”

Eskew noted that Skaggs isn’t the only patient improving through the new program at TCMH.

“So far all of our patients are showing improvements,” Eskew said.

All patients referred to the cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program take part in a six minute walk to identify their individual cardiopulmonary needs.  After completing 36 clinical sessions in the cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program, a patient should be able to walk twice as far, twice as fast.

“Any physician can refer a patient to the program,” Eskew said.  He noted that patients must receive a physician’s referral prior to starting the program.  Patients must also have a pulmonary function test within the past year showing that they qualify for cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.

Once a patient is referred and qualifies for the program, each patient goes through a three-hour initial evaluation.  Eskew explains to each patient his and Mella’s expectations of patients participating in the program.  These expectations include showing up three times a week for rehabilitation and participating in classes outside of the rehab sessions.

“We go through the disease process with patients from A to Z.  We go over medications, and we incorporate a quality of life survey,” Eskew said.  “All of our patients have an individualized counseling and treatment plan.”

Smoking cessation classes and free nicotine replacement are included in the program.  Dietary counseling, group counseling with other lung disorder patients, end of life and advanced directives, are all covered in the program.  Mella also meets with the program patients weekly.

Beverly Keller of Summersville was diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) in 1994, and 10 years ago, she had part of a lung removed.

“The only thing my doctor thought would help me is a program like this one,” Keller said.

Keller’s pulmonologist was located in Rolla, and Keller’s pulmonologist encouraged her to participate in a rehab program.  Due to living in Summersville, Keller needed a program that was closer to home for the thrice weekly rehab sessions.

“I called here and asked if there was a lung therapy program, and they took my name and number telling me that they were planning to start one,” Keller said.

Keller also began cardiopulmonary rehabilitation when the program began in November, and she had noticed some differences in her health, too.

“I have learned how to breathe better,” Keller said referring to the breathing techniques that are taught as part of the program, and she added, “The exercise in the program has also really helped my movement.”

At each treatment session Eskew does a clinical assessment of each patient.  If any health problems seem to be occurring with the patient, the patient can be seen quickly by a physician for diagnosis and treatment.

“Another goal of this program is to limit hospitalizations of patients with lung disorders,” Eskew said.

Medicare covers the cost of the cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program for qualifying patients.  Medicare recipients can qualify for a second round of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.  The TCMH Medivan is also available for patients with transportation needs.

“This program is making a difference in the lives of the patients we are treating,” Eskew said.  “Our patients are regaining their autonomy, assimilating back into regular activities and enjoying an improvement in their lives.”

For additional information about the Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Clinic and the cardiac and pulmonary services offered at TCMH, contact the clinic at (417) 967-4182.


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